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of the united states is at 47%. now, sometimes folks simply don't vote. certainly number built into participating. but 47%, which the obama people thought was the magic number that would put mitt romney into water, this stage what you mentioned it. is not an entirely happy number for barack obama spent and i'm not saying that the election is over. this is in the zone of uncertainty, where lots of things can happen, 12 years ago when george bush was ahead three to six points, depending on the poll and news of his drunk driving arrest. and just stopped his progress but he didn't lose votes but he gained no votes. and al gore stormed and if i did kerry to win the popular vote. and who knows what the next 12 days are going to bring. but looking at the data carefully, i don't want to discount the possibility that michael is right at all. far from me to do that. i just think there's lots of reasons i think that in ohio, it's looking a little stronger for obama than it is for from the. and that the opportunities to win an electoral victory absence of late 1980 break against the presid
, this is "democracy now!" >> in egypt, the united states followed standard operating procedure. standard procedure when one of your favorite dictators gets into trouble. first, the support him as long as possible. but if it becomes really impossible, say the army turns against him, then you send him out to pasture and get the intellectual quest to issue declarations about your love of democracy, then try to restore the bill system as much as possible. >> "who owns the world?" with the presidential election less than two away, we turn to a major new address by noam chomsky on pressing topics not addressed in the president to campaign -- climate change, latin america's break with the united states, the arab spring, and the danger nuclear-weapons already pose in the middle east. >> israel refuses to allow inspections at all, refuses to join the non-proliferation treaty, has hundreds of nuclear weapons, advanced delivery system, and a long record of violence and repression. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are
had. france looks a lot more like the united states, frankly. the western hat name in the last decade is also true you do see it. i haven't done this kind of analysis because as data aren't available to me for other countries. but all the normal indicators of how well those economies are performing say that they've been underperforming in much the same way the united states has been underperforming for the last decade, which it can lends credence to the notion that the this is about is globalization and information technology in the ship and the relative value of intangible assets is tangible assets. >> isn't the real point of difference in the health care you are making quick >> there is a big difference in health care. you're right. [inaudible] >> mind this kind of two-pronged two-pronged -- [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] >> well, on the question of women's earnings, yes, the fact that women are the primary caretakers of children in society as compared to their husbands and a lot of women with children don't have husbands, is certainly a factor. and i felt the biggest factor he
's iraq, the first shia arab led state in history is iraq, but we never mention that. the united states cannot come to terms with the fact today that for the first time america and one of america's key regional pillars, egypt, is in place strategically. you doesn't mean they have to become pro-iranian. they are just in play. they're no longer reflective pro-american the iranian military the first time in 30 years can go through the suez. iran doesn't need syria anymore. american elites have a very hard time coming to terms with these facts. and an even harder time coming to terms with the reality that the arab awakening is accelerating erosion of american standing and position in the middle east, not iran's. but rather than face this reality, americans embrace, particularly elites here in washington, embrace the logic defined proposition that the same drivers of political change and powering islamists in arab countries will somehow transform the islamic republic into a secular liberal state. it is a logic defying proposition. still, reality is what it is. on the eve of 9/11, just over 1
, the ambassador, the syrian ambassador of the united states the time called me a pen was also a friend and academic in the past, computer science at damascus university prior to becoming ambassador. he said david, it's on. i'd forgotten about this will mean. i said what is on? he said well, the president was to meet with you. and so i met with him in may and june of that you're extensively. i interviewed his wife in many other syrian officials. >> host: what was the first baby might? >> well, after the pleasantries and after i explained why wanted to do those, my first substantive substantive sentence to him was mr. president, you know i'm not in politics for s-sierra. you know i'm going to read this but can criticize you. he said that's fine. i know you'll criticize me. i know that because i'm not perfect and i know in the past you criticized my father's policy, but you are always fair and objective from their point of view. and then i told him, you know, mr. president, one of the worst things you ever did? with that? said he let it be known that you like phil collins music, the rocks
-- that the united states provide. we are per expect we can't see perfect. we have brought enormous amount of public goods. your kids will grow up in a different world. and so that's what i've been to cussed on on than what are the source of our strength and how we new them. you can't renew those sources of strength without some kind of political comprise. now i would argue that we're actually two decisions two big decisions away from a melted up in the american economy. if we get a decision on the grand bargain, the kind of ten year time frame we would manage the cut and spending and tax increases and in investments, we need do all three. we need to tax, cut, and invest in the source of our strength. i think that would have a huge effect. i think americans today feel in many ways like children of two divorced parents. i think it's a pal in the country in a lot of ways. it would be huge. if we got a grand bargain on energy how to exploit the boundary of -- i think the two together would have a huge impact. so the question is how close are we to that? and, you know, i have a saying about the middle e
in an interview the united states both economically and militarily and also in terms of its overall influence, really is as strong as it's ever been. he said this on february 21st, 2012 in case you want to pinpoint at least that statement. tom, do you agree with the assertion that right now or in 2012 the united states is as strong as it's ever been? >> that depends, david come if you were speaking about strong, relative in to houma? and in what area. i think there is no question in terms of influence. and on the global stage where the country that is most emulated in the world. but it is possible as mohammed said the world's cleanest dirty shirt also. and so come on a really prefer to think about american strength and i have to answer this question in a little bit of detail in terms of what are the things that have made us strong to start with? and i would argue that we had a formula for success in this country and was built on five pillars. one was educate our people love to and beyond what the technology was so we could get the most out of it. so it was universal primary education, the fac
the united states economy. the price and economic impact would be much greater if these occurred. we hope that this paper which is a departure from the focus of most papers on the consequences of a nuclear iran or a nuclear capable iran will trigger a new discussion and enable an expanded debate on the topic. i would like to introduce michael, the foreign policy director of the bpc, a former oil analyst to boot. he directed this effort and will review some of the key findings. he will introduce our very distinguished panel. mike. >> thank you, senator. thank you everyone for coming. as the senator said, the purpose of this report is really to trigger a debate. we are not suggesting that we have all of the answers, but we wanted to introduce a new dimension to the debate about iran about preventing a nuclear iran. we are not -- focusing on the economics, we are not suggesting the economic issues should drive united states policy one way or another. but it has definitely come up in the debate. it has been raised, certainly in terms of let us say about the impact on sanctions and military, s
of the united states or i am without a seat. [laughter] i have no intention of standing. [laughter] >> i must say i have traveled to banquet circuits for years. i never understood the logistics of dinners like this and how the absence of one individual could cause three of us not to have seats. [laughter] >> vice president, i'm glad to see you here tonight. you said you want to give america back to the little guy. [laughter] mr. president, i am that man. [laughter] >> as i looked out at the ties this evening, i realize i have not seen so many people so well-dressed since i went to a come-as-you-are party. >> a lot of good news from yugoslavia, there's one less name for me to remember. [laughter] [applause] >> you know what this world really needs? it really needs more world leaders named al smith. [laughter] >> it is an honor to share the dias with a descendent of al smith. your great grandfather was my favorite kind of governor. [laughter] the kind who ran for president and lost. [laughter] >> all of that al smith program at c-span.org/thecontenders, and tonight's dinner starting at 9 p.m. e
at an advantage and disadvantage to those other countries including the united states, that it is taking advantage of and finding ways around some of the rules and procedures that exist under the world trade organization and we have to use that mechanism but it doesn't deal with all issues. it isn't clear whether it deals with the currency question. it may be difficult to use wto mechanisms to address some of the things the chinese government is doing through the so-called state owned enterprises to give them an advantage and make it more difficult for outsiders to compete for a share of the market. the point i would make overall is we have to find ways to exert leverage, and we have to pursue an integrated strategy that deals with this full range of issues. i guess since i am thinking of it i have a third point that agrees with jeff to the extent it can be a multilateral effort because i think we share important interests with other and dealing on these issues. >> the final and concluding question tonight will be from garrey wong left teach for china sent to us by e-mail and the question is addre
in order for us to invest in the united states and create jobs. >> we've got some good role models even though this roundtable -- business roundtable doesn't get involved and we don't even great legislators. my expense as a governor is a competitive state, our best teachers on political activist with the labor unions, and then later on george soros. he taught every wealthy individual american you can't afford to sit on the sidelines. and so i say go for it. >> we don't do endorsements either. we have a pack. we're very involved, and last week we launch a retail meets the vote campaign and will probably connect wit with a quar of a million retailers and millions of their employees. not endorsing, not to do that would give them voter guide, encouraging them to be in full. if we're going to address any of the issues, maybe we can get something done everything looks exactly the same. but there's a sense of people of a better understanding of our positions there's a greater likelihood we will get some action on them and that's why we've engaged our membership. >> let's go to questions from t
are approached or anything happens in your professional lives with the united states government that you have any questions about, please come to this committee. we take the work of whistle- blowers and people who give testimony very seriously. you have been critical to bring out things which would not have -- which would not have come out to. i will close with two comments. that i took away from today. he did not produce security at -- you do not reduce security at the -- the same time as you are increasing hazardous duty pay. it does not make sense. i have not heard that question asked and answered. i only heard that it occurred. i think the state department to take away from today and understanding that that sends a message that says, we will pay you for the risk. we will not pay to have you made safer. that is the impression that anyone would get if you reduce the staffing below recommendations or request an increase the pay. i do not think the men and women who service overseas want. i know the compensation for hardship is important, but safety comes first. i have the marine fellow who work
my life to continue that work is your united states senator. >> moderator: thank you. we hope this debate has subfolders as they ponder their decision and a selection only urge you to vote on election day. what you think our candidates, chris murphy and linda mcmahon and our reporter panel, al terzi, dennis house, keisha grant and mark davis if i could have your attention,e program on manufacturing society in the 21st century here at the institute. i welcome you on behalf of the institute both in the audience and those viewing remotely. i wanted to ask our president, walter isaacson, just to say a few words. it's always dangerous when your boss knows as much or more about the subject matter. >> that is definitely not true and that is why it is a pleasure to have tom here at the aspen institute because the one thing we do know about the issue of manufacturing is how important it is to america's economy and how ridiculous it is to try to think of a great economy that doesn't always have a healthy manufacturing sector. and so, when we were looking at the aspen institute and all t
final coverage of the debate. fareed zakaria gdp is next for our viewers in the united states. >>> this is gps the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have a great show for you today. first up, kofi annan. the former secretary-general of the united nations and more recently the u.n. peace envoy to syria. i'll ask him if there's any end in sight for that nation's in sight for that nation's in sight for that nation's in sight for that nation's brutal civil war. and then the u.s. isn't the only major power picking a president for the next few weeks. i'll talk to "the new yorker's" beijing reporter evan osnos about the political tumult in china ahead of the upcoming anointment. also i'll talk to the education innovator sal khan, the founder of khan academy about how best to teach our kids. >>> and what does a company with almost 700 planes and tens of thousands of trucks worry about? fuel. i'll sit down with fedex ceo fred smith to talk about the future of energy. that crucial subject, the future of energy,
>>> this is "gps," the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world, i'm fareed zakaria. the debates are done, the race is heading for the final stretch, and it is still all about the economy. so we'll start with a great panel to talk about the american economy. what is actually going on. >>> then, you've often heard that fracking is controversial. why? we have a debate to help you think it through. >>> and do you think you have enough money? what would be enough? we'll have a fascinating discussion on the subject with lord robert skidelsky, britain's most prominent economic historian on how to answer those questions. >>> and why in the world did the nation of mali get more mention this week in the foreign policy debate than all of japan, mexico, or europe? >>> first, my take. the international monetary fund's latest world economic outlook makes for gloomy reading. growth projections have been revised downward almost everywhere, especially in europe and the big emerging markets like china. yet when looking out over the next four years, coinc
the life of a united states ambassador, an american ambassador. this is serious stuff. americans deserve the truth on what happened. >> greta: so u.n. ambassador rice resign? earlier former secretary of defense donald rumsfeld went on the secretary. mr. secretary, nice to see you, sir. >> thank you. good to be with you. >> greta: there are many calls for ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, to resign. she has the backup of the secretary of state and the president, but there are calls for her to resign after going on all the talk shows and pushing this youtube video as the reason, the cause. your thoughts, sir? >> well, that's really up to the president and ambassador as far as i'm concerned. i think that the president can nominate who he wants, and the senate confirmed her. and she's the ambassador while she's there. i watched the presentation. and i thought it was amazing that someone in her position would go on with that degree of certainty, that fast, and that authoritiatively and be that wrong. >> greta: do you think she was perhaps hung out to dry? i thought it was unusual that the a
is the chief executive officer of the united states. whoever the next president is, they need to demonstrate extraordinary presidential leadership. they need to use the power of the presidency to go to the american people, as ross perot did in 1992, to build a case that we are on a burning platform, to help them understand that everything has to be on the table, to provide principles and a framework for action, and to call the first three words of the constitution "we the people" to work with the president to solve the problem, because if you do not keep the economy strong, everything will suffer over time -- job opportunities, domestic tranquility. >> did you feel in 1992 and 1996, that we can get out of our deficits, and we ran four years of surpluses, prior to 9/11 and other things that happened in the last decade. did you think we had solved our problems? >> no, we were just lucky where weaver going through a good time. now we are any time of bad luck. i would really impressed if our president would take this issue right now and explain to the american people what he is going to do, beca
, the united states has made all these mistakes, kind of like a colonial power down through the years. >> right. >> obama spends a lot of time apologizing for america. do you think that will come out in the debate tonight? >> i hope so. romney has shown an ability to be very tough debater while still being very kind. it's a nice combo platter he has, but you have with obama the guy who denied american exceptionalism. we're the only non-imperialist superpower in the history of the world. is he unaware of that? oh, yes, i'm sure english, they think they are exceptional, too. that was his response to american exceptionalism. you had him bowing for all of the world leaders. you had him leading from behind during the arab spring which these guys were so enthusiastic about, and we see the result of it, with the death of our ambassador and three other americans. no, obama's view is not that america is an exceptional country, and i hope that does come out. >> steve mcmahon, we could have actually landed troops in benghazi. that is now coming out. the president actually met with leon panetta, and nothin
assistance today, we will be able to take a broad look at how the arab world is looking at the united states and the u.s. public is looking at the arab world as the arab awakening continues to create a very uncertain and very fast changing environment. so, i am grateful to all of you for coming and look forward to our discussion and at this point i would like to invite shibley telhami to the podium to present the poll. >> thanks a lot, tammie. it's always great to be here. i'm going to just present not the whole thing but some of the findings so we can get on with the conversation i will present a highlight. i just want to give you a little bit of a picture about this particular poll. it was conducted by knowledge networks sample of 737 that is designed to be a national representative in an internet panel. the methodology is described in the information that we will put all and is also available online. i also want to say that it's really my pleasure and honor to partner to the sinnott program at the university of maryland, and a program for policy international policy attitudes and particul
. a lot of people i've heard about the trade conflict between the united states and china on solar panels. this is an interesting prism to view the chinese economy more broadly because this is a classic case of china really pushing hard for big innovation and winding up with little innovation that doesn't get them to where they want to go and part of china's innovation policy is targeting strategic emerging industries. these are the industries that beijing thinks will be the industry's of the future. the biggest is green energy including solar and wind and electric vehicles and other green energy technologies so they have unleashed a lot of funding to support grain energy innovation. most of that funding has created instead of mosul products continuing the same old model process innovation which is making the products created in the west faster and cheaper and therefore using that to take away some of the u.s. market share. they've been very successful doing that on solar energy. china is making solar panels at lower prices than other countries around the world and therefore they are subs
one of which has the potential to decide who the next president of the united states will be. let's begin this hour's coverage in iowa where president obama kicked off a two-day coast-to-coast swing through eight states. he's calling it a campaign marathon extravaganza. likening it to an all-nighter. no surprise his itinerary consistents almost entirely of battleground states. cnn's chief white house correspondent jessica yellin is traveling with the president. >> reporter: wolf, president obama is hopping around the nation stumping for early votes and undecided voters. it's the kind of whirlwind tour you usually see in the last 48 hours before election day. the fact they're doing it 13 days before the ballots are cast is a sign just how important the early vote is to this campaign. now, from davenport, iowa, he heads to colorado, then he has stops in florida, virginia, again in ohio. he's going to las vegas, nevada, overnight. he also stops in las vegas -- in los angeles where he will be taping with jay leno and in chicago, illinois, where he'll be casting his own early ballot. h
for the passport. can you imagine the canadian government coming to the united states congress and asking us for blank passports? domeback. he's dealing with every level from the white house, jimmy carter, who actually approved, tony had one foot out the door in germany and a cable came into his head stop, president is reviewing. 20 minutes later, godspeed, good luck, from the president of the united states. this is unprecedented. because as he said, if this didn't a wealthy american flag was going to be draped all over it. so he's working with the canadians, working wit with a we us, working with the cia bureaucracy, and is working with the state department. and it's difficult to get everybody on the same page with the idea that they are calling the best bad idea they could come up with. he did all that. but beyond that he went and walked them through the airport on his own, which wasn't necessarily in the plan, and our headquarters often tells us don't do that. don't go in the airport with them. if it goes wrong, they will look to you. without even thinking about it they will turn and look
he is not ready to be the commander-in-chief of the united states military. >> nobody won. it was a draw. >> boring. so boring. it was the most boring debate i've ever seen. >> governor romney, while he may have "lost the debate" looked like a commander-in-chief. and presented himself in a presidential way. >> i think the president was very aggressive and it's hoard win a debate when you're not in that mode. >> i think it's unequivocal, romney won. not just tactically, but strategically. >> eric: so, let's each take a minute or so and call the debate the way we saw it. bob has promised he won't interrupt anyone. start with andrea and run around the table. what did you think? >> andrea: i think it was probably a draw. it's supposed to be boring. it's foreign policy debate not episode of "the a team." romney had one job, to convince the american people he cou job. obama's job was to convince romney he couldn't. i think that he failed at that. i think rom knew yesterday where the obama camp would go, to paint him as a warmonger. he knew where they would throw the ball. he loo
in los angeles. william? >> well, shepard, these weapons sold in the united states and smuggled south continue to produce a staggering body count in mexico. brian terry was one victim. but now univision the spanish language network produced a bombshell documentary that puts a human face on this american scandal with guns traced to fast and furious killed 18 drug rehab center in juarez late in 2009. months later the cartel hit mass cerd 16 at a teenager's birthday party. >> they feel helpless. they don't know what to do and they say who is going to pay for this? by cross-referencing weapons weapons sold in mexico. hundreds of fatalities to the u.s. program. while the mexican government has offered little criticism of the u.s. administration from which it receives hundreds of millions of dollars in aid. the victims are hoping to find justice in u.s. courts. >> go and sue in the united states with these american lawyers. >> now attorney general eric holder did not fire anyone for fast and furious. we are told reviews internally are underway for about a dozen officials. inspector general
and influential spokesman for the worlds of finance and business in the united states. the way it is going to work today is seen narrowing to have this conversation for a few minutes and then and we will open and up to you all for your questions. let me just give one are to conflict of interest on the table. the corporate member. the council on foreign relations, one of around 175 corporate members, and i am a shareholder in the company. unfortunately i am a distinct minority shareholder. i wish it were enough to present a conflict of interest, but is not. of greek heritage. so let's -- the last 24 hours the chancellor of germany has been visiting the country of your ancestors, of your four bears. how worried are you about the prospects for greece cack and what it might mean not just for greece and not just for europe, but the globalization and economic linkages for the estates and indirectly your own institutions . so thank you for the introduction. my ancestors, he can blame me for what's going on there. as a side note i remember my grandfather coming home years ago and yelling and screaming abo
look for in the president of the united states of america. i'm proud that important military figures who are supporting me in this race, former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff john shalikashvili, just yesterday, general eisenhower's son, general john eisenhower, endorsed me, general admiral william crown, general tony mcbeak, who ran the air force war so effectively for his father -- all believe i would make a stronger commander in chief. and they believe it because they know i would not take my eye off of the goal, osama bin laden. unfortunately, he escaped in the mountains of tora bora. we had him surrounded. but we didn't use american forces, the best trained in the world, to go kill him. the president relied on afghan warlords and he outsourced that job too. that's wrong. >> new question, two minutes, senator kerry." colossal misjudgments." what colossal misjudgments, in your opinion, has president bush made in these areas? >> well, where do you want me to begin? first of all, he made the misjudgment of saying to america that he was going to build a true alliance, that he w
of global test before u.s. troops are deployed pre-emptively to protect the united states. that's part of a track record that goes back to the 1970's when he ran for congress the first time and said troops should not be deployed without u.n. approval. then in the mid 1980's, he ran on the basis of cutting most of our major defense programs. in 1991, he voted against desert storm. it's a consistent pattern over time of always being on the wrong side of defense issues. a little tough talk in the midst of a campaign or as part of a presidential debate cannot obscure a record of 30 years of being on the wrong side of defense issues. and they give absolute no ibbed case based on that record of being willing to go forward and aggressively pursue the war on terror with the kind of strategy that will defeat our enemies and will guarantee the united states doesn't get attacked by the likes of al qaeda. >> we'll get back to that topic. tonight we mentioned afghanistan. we believe that osama bin laden is hiding perhaps in a cave somewhere along the afghan-pakistan border. if you get a second term
. still, turkish lawmakers today voted to authorize cross border attacks. in the united states, secretary of state, hillary clinton, called the turkish foreign minister and pled the united states support. syria was the ally of turkey but now it is a bitter enemy after syria erupted in a bloody civil war 19 months ago, a violent revolution which human rights groups say has killed some 30,000 people. the chief fox correspondent, jonathan hunt, is like with the news. tensions are clearly still very high along that border. >>jonathan: they are. syria share as lengthy border with turkey. it is just on the syrian side of that border where the rebels are in many towns the strongest. it is across that border that many of the refugees from the civil war in syria have fled. it is a border that turkey says it has the right and more importantly, perhaps, the ability to defend. in so doing, at the moment, it has the complete support of the united states. listen. >> from our perspective, the response that turkey made was appropriate. it also was designed to strengthen the deterrent effect so these kind
and we must consider rush are number one enemy. number three it angers and alienates the united states and number four increasing the eighth against turkey whose aragon regime is backing the rebels. why is russia doing this? n there is continued disunity in the ranks of the rebels although as of this morning reportedly there is another chance they say to unify. they hopefully moscow won't be able to oust aside a number to the u.s. and turkey as of yet have not been willing to extend their syrian brother of however turkish prime minister erdogan is his strong and continues to be provoked by syrian shelling the influx of refugees he may take action. this is why in recent baseball in the shelling in turkeys horsing down of syrian jet flight from moscow to damascus russia has tried to -- by increasing the supply of national gas to turkey to maintain good relations between russia and turkey despite what's happening in syria. conclusion, moscow is taking a major middle east gamble with his policy in syria. at the gamble fails, and i think it will, hopefully if the u.s. gets them little more
powder with the maritime powers, like brittany is to be our today, the united states. and then, there is an american and he put these two ideas together. and where the two great powers, the land power and d.c. power come together, he called the shout about. and the middle east is located in one of the world's great shutterbugs. the interesting thing is about them is that small states have the ability to shift the power from one large side to the other, simply because it depends on which side they're on or which side they decide to shift two. in the middle east, the old part with syria and is today. but, after the fall of the soviet union, after the end of the cold war, there was another heart. since the entire east were taking place at that time, when the circulation state joined the middle east, when afghanistan pushed the edge of the middle east. and so today, we have a second part inside the middle east and that is iran. and those two cards, with their particular allies are causing this growing second global cold war. now the first indication we have is that is the reincarna
muslims, not have them isolate the united states of america. i know i can do a better job in iraq. i have a plan to have a summit with all of the allies, something this president has not yet achieved, not yet been able to do to bring people to the table. we can do a better job of training the iraqi forces to defend themselves, and i know that we can do a better job of preparing for elections. all of these, and especially homeland security, which we'll talk about a little bit later. >> mr. president, you have a 90- second rebuttal. >> i, too, thank the university of miami, and say our prayers are with the good people of this state, who've suffered a lot. september the 11th changed how america must look at the world. and since that day, our nation has been on a multi-pronged strategy to keep our country safer. we pursued al qaida wherever al qaida tries to hide. seventy-five percent of known al qaida leaders have been brought to justice. the rest of them know we're after them. we've upheld the doctrine that said if you harbor a terrorist, you're equally as guilty as the terrorist. and the t
. >>shepard: officials reportedly say the united states may have put too much faith in newly trained libyan security guards. catherine is live from washington, dc, with the story. what do we know of the libyan security guards? >>reporter: intelligence sources tell fox that the libyan security forces "melted away when the attack happened" and there is "confirmation the security for the consulate, some elements, were acting in concert with the terrorists." a short time ago, as to the status of the consulate, the state department is sending all questions to the f.b.i. >> all of the officials having to do with the staws of the scene in benghazi, what it was, what it is, they are now the province of the f.b.i. as they go forward with this investigation. i will send you to them on any those questions. >>reporter: as we reported, 20 days of at murder of the four americans, the f.b.i. has yet to step foot in benghazi. in other words, we have a situation in eastern libya where the mission is part of a wild west and we do not have any firm control of that. >>shepard: a lot of people are weighing in o
to president obama for two years. >> no one in the united states, you know, less in japan and i hope in china wants to see shots fired over three or four uninhabited rocks in the east china sea. as long as we're concentrating on the sovereignty issue, we're probably not going to get anywhere. on the other hand, the resource issues can be addressed separately, without regard to sovereignty. >> bader says the u.s. government doesn't intend to mediate. he called on both sides to refrain from any action that could be considered a provocation. he argued the violent protests in china against japan's nationalization of the islands were counterproductive, unwise, and damaging to china itself. >> it made china look like an aggrieved third-world country that was not acting like an international community. >> japanese leaders say their claim to the senkaku islands dates back to 1895. chinese officials maintain their country was forced to give up the territory after losing the sino-japanese war. >>> the philippines and vietnam have appealed to the international community for a peaceful and legal resoluti
to stand by our allies. the tensions that exist between israel and the united states is very unfortunate. the defense program, of poland that was very unfortunate. that disrupted the that disrupted the relationship in some ways that really was -- existed between us. when the students took to the streets in tehran and the people protested and the green revolution occurred, for the president to be a silent was a mistake. we have to stand for our allies and stand for a stronger economy. >> america remains the one indispensable nation. the world needs a strong america. it is stronger now than when i came into office. we were able to refocus our attention not only on the terrorist threat, but also be getting a transition process in a afghanistan. it allowed us to refocus on the relationships that have been neglected for a decade. our alliances have never been stronger with asia, europe, africa, israel, where we have had an unprecedented military cooperation in dealing with rats. what we have been able to do is position ourselves so we can start rebuilding america. making sure we are pretty ma
than millions of americans witnessed the president of the united states mislead you, the voters, about everything from his own record to his opponent's views. now thanks to president obama, the truth went untold for more than 90 long minutes during the second presidential debate, and on "hannity," we're going to fact check the president's claims. we're going to set the record straight. heated exchange of the evening, and that of course being the terrorist attack. here's how it went down inside the debates hall last night. >> on the day following the assassination of united states ambassador, the first time that's happened since 1979, when we have four americans killed know what happened, that the president the day after that happened, flies to las vegas for political fundraiser. >> the day after the attack, governor, i stood in the rose garden and i told the american people and the world that we are going to find out exactly what happened, that this was an act of terror. >> i think it's interesting the president just said something, which is that on the day after the attack, he went in
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